The 8D Association



The Cheshire Lines Committee.

A study of the 15 stations that fall within the 8D area.

Liverpool Central.

Opened on 2nd March 1874 as the Western terminus of the CLC the station was a typical design for a terminus at the time. Situated at the end of a tunnel with a train shed roof and a large concourse. It was earmarked for closure with the Beeching Report in 1963. With this a new chord was opened at Allerton and virtually every service was diverted into Lime Street. The terminal slowly decayed until only one platform was used for the hourly service to Gateacre. The station finally closed on 17th April 1972 and was promptly demolished to facilitate the building of what became the Northern Line of the Merseyrail underground.


Taken in 1971,  looking towards the booking office and main building at Liverpool Central with most of the track now lifted and several platforms in use as a car park the station looks ready for closure which would happen in under 12 months. Photo by Les Fifoot.


A BR Class 108 dmu, Set No AN254  awaits to depart a clearly run down Central Station on 15th August 1969 to Hunts Cross Station. The final service to run from Central was the hourly one to Gateacre which used the short length of track left when all the rest of the loop line was lifted. This service would be diverted to Lime Street when Central was to finally close in 1972. Photograph by J.A. Sommerfield.


A great shot of the concourse with one of the  stations ticket booths taken in 1971. Note the enamel Gentlemen toilet sign. Photo by Les Fifoot.


Another 1971 view, the tunnel mouth at Central station it is evident how the station had to be carved out in places from the sandstone that surrounds the city. Photo by Les Fifoot.


An image taken two days before closure, a general view of the station and signal box, presenting a very run down appearance to say the least. 15th April 1972. Photograph by G.Sykes.


Taken same day as previous image, a BR Class 108 dmu departs the station and about to pass what was the one road engine shed which had a water tank above it. The train is now heading for Gateacre Station via Hunts Cross Station. 15th April 1972. Photograph by G.Sykes.

For more information and pictures click here

Liverpool St James.

This station was located in a deep cutting not far from Central station and some of the station was hewn out of the sandstone that encircles the city of Liverpool. Sadly the station closed, as with many others, as an economy measure during the First World War on 1st January 1917. The station was never to re-open. However, currently there are proposals to reopen the station on the current site due to the increase in population in the surrounding area. As things stand, it is subject to the neccessary funding as and when.

We have no picture of the station or its site if you do and would like to share it please send it to 8d.association at gmail.com it will be shown here and fully credited.
For more information and pictures on Liverpool St James click here

Brunswick.

The original terminus station at Brunswick was opened on 1st June 1864 by the CLC this station closed with the opening of Liverpool Central on 2nd March 1874. With the re generation that has happened in the area Merseytravel decided to open a new station on 9th March 1998. It has a modern ticket office on the Liverpool bound platform and is a well used station with a frequent service to Liverpool and Hunts Cross.


Brunswick station looking east, the modern ticket office can be seen on the down platform. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

St Michaels.

Opened as part of the original Liverpool and Garston Railway which was promoted by the Great Central and absorbed by the CLC when the line from Garston to Manchester was completed. The station which opened on 1st June 1864 is located in a cutting with booking office at street level standing on the short tunnel which is directly to the west of the station. As with other stations along the line it closed on 17th April 1972 to allow the building of the Northern Line and re opened on 3rd January 1978. The station is still open today and has an intensive service and in 2010/11 attracted over 460,000 passenger journeys.


In the days when first class travel was available on DMU's and prior to the building of the access ramps for the Liverpool Garden Festival this rail blue service for Liverpool central High Level prepares to depart from St Michaels station. 17th August 1970. Photo by K G Rose.


A Class 508 emu, No 508123 arrives at St Michaels Station with 13.35hrs Southport to Hunts Cross train. 26th February 1988. Copyright: Doug Birmingham.


The street level building at St Michaels are, as many others along the line the classic CLC type. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


At platform level looking east the large ramps were installed for the Liverpool Garden Festival in 1984 to provide a better flow of passengers to and from the platform. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Mersey Road and Aigburth.

Opened as part of the Liverpool and Garston Railway on 1st June 1864 the station now has an intensive service seven days a week and this is reflected in the passenger usage with over 680,000 passenger journeys to or from the station in 2010/11. The station was closed on 17th April 1972 but re opened as part of the Northern line on 3rd January 1978.


The street level buildings at Aigburth station are well maintained with a private business using part of the building. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Merseyrail Class 508, No 508137 arrives at Aigburgh Station with 2U25 Southport to Hunts Cross train. This view shows how well the station has been restored to almost its former glories. 7th August 2015. Copyright: Doug Birmingham.


The canopy has retained its original brackets and is netted off to prevent birds roosting. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Cressington and Grassendale.

This station was a later addition opening around April 1872 but only appearing in timetables from April 1873. The station is located in a cutting with buildings at street level and an original brick built waiting room located on platform 2 which has recently been refurbished and is now in use for passengers. The station closed on 17th April 1972 but re opened on 3rd January 1978. It is still busy today with over 420,00 passenger journeys in 2010/11.


A 1977 view of Cressington station during rebuilding work to lengthen the platforms and install a new footbridge. The station had been closed since 17th April 1972 and would reopen on 3rd January 1978 as part of the Merseyrail network. Photo by edgehillsignalman. (To view more by the photographer click here )


The charming street level buildings, well maintained and presented. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.
 

Looking towards Liverpool at platform level, shows another example how well Cressington Station has been restored to former glories as a Merseyrail Class 508, No 508124 arrives with a train for Hunts Cross Station. 7th August 2015. Copyright: Doug Birmingham


The Liverpool bound waiting room is in use here. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The original CLC drinking fountain is still on the eastbound platform, sadly no longer in use but a good reminder of the lines rich heritage. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The platform canopy supports have been retained and still provide cover for passengers waiting to travel east. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Garston.

Opened by the CLC on 1st April 1874 the station has had an interesting life built in the classic CLC style it was closed on 17th April 1972 to allow the line re building it re opened on 3rd January 1978. The station had decayed during the six year closure period and was refurbished to a high standard. Sadly the station was to close on 10th June 2006 with the completion of the new Liverpool South Parkway interchange station located only a few yards away.


A 1960's view of the main platform buildings at Garston prior to the closure of the line for the conversion to the Northern Line. Sadly the classic CLC buildings were not retained and subsequently demolished. From the D K Jones Collection. (Photo supplied by Transport Image Archive).


Garston Station (with new booking office) seen shortly before full closure and trains beginning to use Liverpool South Parkway which can be seen just beyond the bridge in the background. MR Class 508, No 508103 arrives with an evening Hunts Cross to Southport train. 9th June 2006. Copyright: Doug Birmingham.

Liverpool South Parkway.

Opened 11th June 2006 this large station has six platforms with two platforms on the Northern Line. It acts as an interchange station between the City Line and the Northern Line it now has a bus link to John Lennon Airport. The station is of a modern design and only time will tell if it looks as good in one hundred years time as the ex CLC stations still do. 


MR Class 507, No 507002 in its unique 'Liverpool Hope Universary' livery arrives at platform 6 at Liverpool South Parkway with a Hunts Cross to Southport train. LSP provide's an interchange with the main line station and a useful bus connections including John Lennon Airport. 15th February 2015. Copyright: Doug Birmingham

Hunts Cross.

Opened in May 1874 the station appeared in Bradshaw in May 1875 this was the largest of the stations along the line with four platform faces. The platforms have since been reduced to three with platform three now a dead end used by MerseyRail Electrics terminating there as this is the end of the third rail electrification. The station enjoys an excellent service to Liverpool and Manchester and this is reflected in the passenger journey figures with over 1.1 million in 2010/11



The station viewed in the 1960's from platform one with the canopy of the island platforms, 2 and 3 with their relevant numbers clearly displayed. The one platform now not used is platform 4 with its classic CLC waiting room. From the D K Jones Collection (Photo supplied by Transport Images Archive)


The original street level buildings at Hunts Cross are now in use as a public house, the new ticket office is visible to the right of the old building. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Looking over the bridge at the west end of the station, the Mersey rail trains can use either platform two or three. It is more usual for them to use the dead end platform three as seen here, with through services using one and two. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The bridge at the west end of the platforms at Hunts Cross is quite unusual having the original stone arch and a later addition of a steel bridge fashioned into the existing stone bridge. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Halewood.

Opened in May 1874 the station was not located in a highly populated area and thus suffered from low passenger numbers. This resulted in it being an early closure being closed on 17th September 1951. The story does not end there though, with housing development in the area it was decided that a station was needed so a new one was built located six chains to the west of the original. So a new Halewod station was opened on 16th May 1988 at a cost of £440,000 which attracted over 102,000 passengers in 2010/11.

We do not have a picture of the original station if you have and would like to share it please send it to 8d.association at gmail.com it will be shown here and fully credited.


Looking east at the new Halewood station the station is a basic affair with a ticket office at street level and two basic brick built waiting shelters. 28th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan. (For more information and pictures click here )

Hough Green.

Opened in May 1874 the station has the classic CLC buildings which are still in use today. The booking office occupies part of the main building with a Taxi firm using the rest. The original brick built waiting shelter on platform 2 is still in use. 165,000 passengers used the station in 2010/11. To the east of the station was the junction for the GC & MR Widnes Joint line which was closed on 6th December 1964 the whole joint line has been lifted.


Taken sometime in 1964, a LMS 'Black 5' with a Class Two train for Manchester runs through platform two at Hough Green Station. Photo by Neville Conroy.


A twin 2 car Derby Class 108 disgorges its passengers whilst a later built Class 108 passes through at speed with a Liverpool bound service, taen during the 1960's. Photo by Gordon Howarth.

Widnes.

This station has had so many different names it is hard to keep track it was opened on 1st August 1873 as Farnworth, re-named Farnworth for Widnes in 1914, re-named Farnworth for Appleton in 1938, re-named Farnworth on 5th January 1959 and then re-named plain Widnes from 6th May 1968. The station still has its main building on platform one which is still used as a booking office with a shop and beauty parlour occupying the rest. 


Widnes station looking north in the 1970's, the sign still reads as Widnes North even though the station had been re named over a decade before. The brick built waiting  room on platform one has already been replaced by a modern bus shelter type. Photo by John Mann. 



A Class 25 deposits its load of ballast during engineering works at Widnes station. 6th February 1983. Photo by John Wilson.


Widnes station forecourt which is a great example of the CLC style of building. The ticket office uses part of the building with a beauty salon in the left hand side. 26th January 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Sankey for Penketh.

Opened in May 1874 as plain Sankey the suffix of Penketh being added in 1904. The station has the classic CLC style main building which is partly used as a private residence with the remaining portion still staffed as a ticket office. The station has only two trains per hour during peak times and has no Sunday service. Despite this nearly 100,000 passengers used the station in 2010/11.


Very much a typical Cheshire LInes Committe station is 'Sankey for Penketh' station mid way between Widnes and Warrington. 'Northern' Class 156, No 156420 just arrived with 2O92 to Manchester Oxford Road. Since the opening of the Warrington West station, only a handful of trains per day only stop at Sankey. 16th July 2019. Copyright: Doug Birmingham


The station forecourt showing the CLC buildings the left hand side of which is a private residence. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The now unused station clock, all the stations along the line were provided with the same type. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Warrington West

The newest station on the line, opened in December 2019 at a cost of £20.5 million and was built by Network Rail, The station was built to serve the nearby Chapelford urban housing village and includes a park and ride for 287 cars. With the opening of this station has meant a reduction of trains serving Sankey for Penketh station as that is approx a 100o yds away to the west of Warrington West.  

The newest station on the line is Warrington West Station, opened in 2019 to serve the new housing estates in the area. A CAF Class 195, No 195102 arrives with 2O95 to Manchester Oxford Road on 12th March 2020. Copyright: Doug Birmingham. 


The new combined booking office and waiting room for Warrington West Station. February 2020. Copyright: Doug Birmingham

Warrington Central.

Opened on 1st August 1873 as plain Warrington with the suffix of Central being added in 1875. The station has always been busy and today is as busy as ever with as many as eight trains per hour. It has the highest passenger numbers of the stations featured here with 1.4 million people using it in 2010/11. Extensive goods facilities were provided to the east of the station and the large CLC warehouse has survived. It lay derelict for many years and has since been converted into appartments.


The station platforms viewed from the signal box during the 1980's as a Speno rail grinder runs through. Photo by James Mackenzie. (To view more of the James Mackenzie collection click here )


The original entrance for Warrington Central station. This entrance was underused as the convenient way into the station was via the steps from the adjacent road. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The new entrance to Warrington Central replaced the earlier side entrance which most foot passengers had used. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Viewed from the signal box in the 1970's, was the still busy yard at Warrington Central with the CLC warehouses in the background. Along with the Class 47 and 08 Cartic car transporters several 4 wheeled vans and the BR yellow cranes which were once a familiar sight in goods yards across the network can be seen. Photo by James Mackenzie. (To view more of the James Mackenzie collection click here )


The goods warehouse has now been converted into residential accommodation. The have still retained most of their character. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Another view from the side of the goods warehouse. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Padgate.

Opened on 1st September 1873 the station has the classic CLC buildings which are no longer used by the railway as the station is un-staffed. They are still partially in use though with a Fish and Chip shop using part and now closed Garden Centre occupied the remaining portion. The station is well kept and was used by over 80,000 passengers in 2010/11.


The station forecourt as seen today the Fish and Chip shop occupies the left hand side of the building. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The main buildings on the platform side. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The unused waiting room on the Warrington bound platform. 4th May 2013. Photo by Terry Callaghan.








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